Snowshoes on April 5th

Yes, those are snowshoes, and yes, this IS April 5th.  Although this are often gets spring snows in April, it is usually after the frost has come out of the ground, and the snow melts quickly.  This year the frost has come out only in some areas, and the amount of snow was greater than I remember.       So, I got out the snow shoes to get to the greenhouse at the bottom …

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Jammin’

What does one do when winter returns on March 30th?  Make jam, of course!  I will be selling jam here at Keppers during the Earth Arts show Saturday, May 5th and Sunday, May 6th.  Here are the raspberry – blackberry on the left and black currant on the right.  I have also made strawberry, ripe bell pepper, and organic peach.  Other than the peaches I got in Viroqua last summer, the jams are made from …

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Potting Soil

Few people knew which tasks Ken did and which I did.  We formed a good team, and I guess to many people the pieces were seamless.  Ken did the planting.  He made the potting soil in fall, brought in enough to fill four or five fifty gallon plastic barrels, made the soil blocks, planted, watered and transplanted. In Ken’s absence I found empty barrels – he hadn’t felt good enough to make the potting soil.  …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This box has sprouts, onions, garlic, celery root, carrots, beets, black radishes, kohlrabi, and dried black beans Field Notes.  This is our final box.  After twenty – three years I think we can say it was a good run.  We have delivered vegetables to people on time without fail for all those years.    Each box had at least eight  different varieties, and many had over twelve.  Ken did a marvelous …

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Opening the Greenhouse

Spring planting in the greenhouse all depends on the weather.  The air and soil temperature inside the greenhouse is much more important than the date. Some years Ken had planted in February, but this year we had early cold with no snow cover, so the frost went deep into the soil.  We have also had more cloudy than sunny weather, so there has not been much solar gain once the sun has some real heat …

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Onions Make You Wait; They are Worth It.

The first seeds Ken planted each season were the onions.  Since I had bought seeds, I decided to try planting them in Ken’s germination cabinet.  These are the first seeds I have planted since the bean seed in the cup in kindergarten.  Although I called a friend for tips, I had low expectations.   So much could go wrong.  Was the soil too wet, too dry, did I put enough soil covering the seeds, too …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This week’s box has sprouts, dry beans, carrots, beets, onions, garlic, kohlrabi, celery root, radishes, and cabbage.     Field Notes.  This weekend I plant to use some of the potting soil to plant onion seed.  Wish me luck!  Ken had done all the planting. In the kitchen I started sprouts for this week.    From the Kitchen.  Sprouts are a sure sign of spring.  This cold winter the frost has …

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Shelling Dry Beans

This winter I am spending many an evening shelling dry beans.  Most years it is dry in fall and I set up a mud box and fan in the yard, walk on the pods and winnow the beans.      But it was damp this fall so I brought in the pods, set them on  racks by the cook stove and once they were dry I began shelling       I sit and listen …

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Winter Salad

Each winter when pomegranate season rolls around Ken used to make this salad.  He left me a pomegranate, so I made my version.  Core and cut up a couple apples.  Open up the pomegranate and separate fruit from skin and membranes.  Toast some walnuts or pecans and chop.  Make a dressing with yogurt, a bit of maple syrup, and if desired vanilla.  Combine ingredients and serve.  Ken added raisins, I think.

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This CSA box has sprouts, onions, garlic, beets, carrots, black radishes, Kohlrabi, celery root, and Cherokee Trail of Tears Dry beans.     Field Notes.  We are at the midpoint between solstice and equinox.  These mid points are where the drama happens – Solstices and equinoxes mark a conclusion of lengthening days or lengthening nights.    Most religions and folklore have names for these points: St Brigid, St Blaise, or Candlemas …

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