Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This box has sprouts, onions, garlic, celery root, carrots, beets, black radishes, kohlrabi, and dried black beans Field Notes.  This is our final box.  After twenty – three years I think we can say it was a good run.  We have delivered vegetables to people on time without fail for all those years.    Each box had at least eight  different varieties, and many had over twelve.  Ken did a marvelous …

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Sushi Making – Now I am Learning How

Ken used to teach people to make nori maki.  This is sushi rolled in a sheet of nori – a sea weed that is pressed into a thin flat sheet.  And the term sushi refers not to raw fish, but to the rice cooking process.  Sushi is rice cooked with some rice vinegar to soften it so it can be carefully pressed into shapes or rolled.  Sashimi was the term used for raw fish when …

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March When Ken Made Me a Birthday Souffle

Ken was an excellent cook; his last job was as a private chef to one of the Pillsbury family.  When we first dated, Ken would get me a card and try to buy something or take me out for my birthday.            In March egg season is in full swing, and one year I asked him to make me a souffle.  He did and it became our habit.  Each year he …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This week’s box has sprouts, dry beans, carrots, beets, onions, garlic, kohlrabi, celery root, radishes, and cabbage.     Field Notes.  This weekend I plant to use some of the potting soil to plant onion seed.  Wish me luck!  Ken had done all the planting. In the kitchen I started sprouts for this week.    From the Kitchen.  Sprouts are a sure sign of spring.  This cold winter the frost has …

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Sprout Suggestion

Each winter we grow sprouts.  I often make sprout salads, and they are also great in sandwiches in place of lettuce.  Today for lunch I made guacamole and had an open faced sandwich with sprouts.     I had bought some avocados on sale, sliced them open, removed pit, scooped out flesh and combined with minced onion, lemon juice, a bit of mayo, salt, pepper, and topped with some chili powder.     Then I …

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Winter Salad

Each winter when pomegranate season rolls around Ken used to make this salad.  He left me a pomegranate, so I made my version.  Core and cut up a couple apples.  Open up the pomegranate and separate fruit from skin and membranes.  Toast some walnuts or pecans and chop.  Make a dressing with yogurt, a bit of maple syrup, and if desired vanilla.  Combine ingredients and serve.  Ken added raisins, I think.

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Beet Salad

This time of year I try old ingredients in new combinations.  This week I received some blue cheese and remembered this recipe for beet salad. Boil beets until you can slip the skins.  Chop. Set aside. Toast walnuts or pecans and chop. Set aside. In a serving bowl make the dressing: olive oil, mild rice or white wine vinegar, a bit of honey, dijon mustard, salt and pepper.  Add the beets, chopped nuts, some crumbled …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This CSA box has sprouts, onions, garlic, beets, carrots, black radishes, Kohlrabi, celery root, and Cherokee Trail of Tears Dry beans.     Field Notes.  We are at the midpoint between solstice and equinox.  These mid points are where the drama happens – Solstices and equinoxes mark a conclusion of lengthening days or lengthening nights.    Most religions and folklore have names for these points: St Brigid, St Blaise, or Candlemas …

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One of Ken’s Favorites

Ken loved fruit.  Each winter he would buy pears.  And when a bunch ripened all at once he would bake them!  His recipe: Halve lengthwise and with a small spoon scoop out core.  Place cut side up on a baking pan.  Place small pieces of butter on pears.  Drazzle (a Ken word) the pears with maple syrup and brandy.  Sprinkle with ground cloves.  Bake and serve.  Leftovers are great warmed in the warming oven of …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This CSA box has onions, garlic, rutabaga, kohlrabi, daikon or black radish, winter squash or pie pumpkins, beets, carrots and cabbage Field Notes. As I write this on Monday, snow is swirling around, and I join the snow day joy of school children.  Snow acts as an insulating blanket over the garden and helps slow the frost dropping into the soil.  The frost will affect how soon soil temperatures are warm …

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