Fall on the Farm

Although we are still busy, once in a while I take the camera with me so I can catch a few elusive fall photos.  Here is the field       And here is the mobile high tunnel           And our drive It is a beautiful time of year, isn’t it?

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This week’s CSA box has tomatoes, potatoes, celery, cucumber, zucchini, onions, garlic, carrots, melon, basil and parsley Filed Notes.  Ken is always thinking ahead! Monday he started moving chicks and chickens.  He has several batches of chicks at varying ages.  He is making room for the newer hens in one of the portable coops.  The young roosters – cockerels – will go in the north coop.  He has moved the larger …

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Turkey Chicks – if you can see them

For a few years now Ken has been working with a heritage breed of turkeys.  It has been a real challenge.  They really are closer to wild and would prefer to roost high in trees and hatch out a clutch in tall grass and get outside the fence and roam.  Even with Oscar on duty there have been losses.   This year we seem to have a good mom; she is keeping the bunch together …

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Here a Chick, There a Chick…

Ken has been perfecting his broody hen management this season.  The result has been several hatches of chicks.  At first he put them together, but it seemed the older ones were picking on the younger ones.  So now he has several small outside enclosures with chicken wire and fiberglass fence posts.     There are the tiny chicks               There are the chicks that a renegade hen hatched out …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This week’s CSA box has tomatoes, potatoes, zucchini, cucumbers, kohlrabi, onions, garlic, peppers, sweet corn, parsley, and basil. Field Notes.  The tsunami of tomatoes has crested; early varieties are about done.  Later varieties are still going strong.  It has been an interesting season – cooler nights meant later hot weather crops and heavy dew meant more work to prevent molds, fungus and blights.  Ken has moved up those seedlings pictured last …

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By Labor Day Pigs Become Hogs

The decades old expression here is, “By Labor Day the pigs become hogs.”  We have raised feeder pigs for decades.  They are a great help on a small farm.  Each year Ken has a tilling project so he grazes them sequentially.  On any given year they might expand a garden space, dig out the quack grass outside the garden, or clear a fence line.     They eat garden culls and many things people won’t …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This week’s CSA box has tomatoes, potatoes, onions, garlic, cucumber, zucchini, kohlrabi, lettuce, basil and parsley.   Field Notes.  People often wonder what I mean when I say nearly every week that planting continues.  Well this week I have a photo of several of the fall greens.  Ken finds that in August it is often easier to start greens indoors where he can regulate temperature and moisture.  Another advantage of transplanting …

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A Bit of Nostalgia as Blackberry Season and Summer Wane

Each year when I start picking blackberries I think of my maternal grandmother, Flora E. Patch.  When I knew her she was a farm wife.  She and my grandfather had a dairy farm in Vermont.  She grew up in a farm family and as a young single woman she taught school.  My grandfather was the older brother of one of her students.  After they married they lived in a small town and had a coal …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This week’s CSA box has tomatoes, potatoes, celery, lettuce, cucumber, zucchini, onions. garlic. kale, corn, basil, and apples       Field Notes.  Ken is getting the short season fall crops in now.  The long season fall crops are doing well.  He got the year’s compost mixed for next season.  And in his spare time it’s mowing, weeding, and harvesting.  Weeds that aren’t mowed will drop seeds for a new crop …

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Making Compost

Each season Ken makes compost. Each year he combines the winter chicken bedding with hay and straw and leaves and other organic matter that varies from year to year.  In the past he shoveled chicken bedding and shook out all the baled hay.  A few years back he purchased a manure spreader.  The manure spreader breaks clods, shakes out hay and mixes the components beautifully.   He loads the spreader, cuts the baling twine, and …

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