And from the freezer – Asparagus for Cream of Asparagus Soup

Each year I freeze some vegetables.  In winter it is nice to have a taste of summer in the form of frozen berries or sweet corn or bell peppers, etc.  I freeze a couple quart bags of blanched, chopped asparagus.  Why?  It makes GREAT cream of asparagus soup in February.  Asparagus is considered a tonic for kidneys. Saute onion, add soup stock, herbs like thyme and tarragon and thawed asparagus. Run through blender, processor or …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden! This CSA box has greens, onions, garlic, potatoes, carrots, beets, squash, and parsley. Field Notes.  Ken did get into the green house and started cleaning, clearing and getting ready to plant  The weather has been unseasonably warm. Rather than celebrating we are wary.  for the past two years Ken has lost his grape crop.    Warm nights above freezing often sets plants in gear and if they are flowering or setting …

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Too Warm Too Early

As many cavort and celebrate this unseasonably warm weather, I am grumbling.  Why?  I see why it is NOT good.  And the list is long!       Maple syrup – best if days in March are 40 degrees in daylight and 20 at night, sunny, no wind.  Too warm and the sap stays in the tree top and forms buds and leaves Fruit.  Apples, cherries, elderberries, grapes, plums and other tree or perennial fruit …

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Local Food in Winter

Most years in August someone starts a “local food challenge.”  My challenge is more like Barbara Kingsolver’s in her book Animal, Vegetable Miracle or Joan Dye Gussow in This Organic Life.  How much of our diet year round can be local?  Ken and I store many crops available for sale this time of year.  Onions, squash, garlic, potatoes, beets, carrots, black or daikon radishes, giant kohlrabi.  Until last week we had winter tomatoes, cabbage, rutabagas. …

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Egg Season is Here!

Eggs have a season.  It starts as the days lengthen – usually early February.  Think lent and Easter; there is a reason that Easter bunny has a basket of eggs!       Eggs are a versatile, great source of protein.  Our hens have a nutritious diet of sprouted grains, organic ground feed, kitchen culls and pasture.  Everyone tells us they can taste the difference.     Here is their portable coop in spring, summer, …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This box has pie pumpkins, onions, garlic, carrots, potatoes, beets, celery root, parsley, and salad mix Field Notes.  Happy Ground Hog’s Day, Imbolc, St Brigid’s Day, St. Blaze, Candlemas – or whatever you may call it.  This midway point between solstice and equinox is when the days lengthen dramatically, the cold doesn’t last, and Ken starts monitoring temperatures in greenhouses.  We are in transition and can feel spring’s approach.   The …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  The box this week has salad mix, potatoes, tomatoes, squash, onions, garlic, carrots, and cabbage         Field Notes.  Ken continues planting for the salad mixes, and has been making pottery.  Soon he will start full season crops like onions and celery and parsley.  Then it will be one planting after the next.  Soon after that Ken will be seeding and transplanting in green houses.  This time of year …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This CSA box has salad mix, cabbage, potatoes, winter tomatoes, onions, garlic, winter squash, carrots, and beets Field Notes.   Ken’s winter routine is to ski out to the greenhouses and check for deer and rodent damage.  Soon he will be checking the inside temperatures in  for planting! Ken continues planting in winter – he is planting greens for salad mix.  People ask why we don’t do shoots and micro greens year …

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Ken and the Dry Corn

Ken husked and shelled the dry corn.  He has an antique sheller he has in a box.  It is loud, but effective!         We have two types – a yellow and a blue – black.  Here are the empty cobs.  Ken may burn them to an ash for a pottery glaze.         Then he screens the corn and places in buckets with lids.  This is our dry corn for …

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Jammin’ and Winin’

The pork was ready at the locker so I organized the freezers.  I had enough fruit to make some jam and wine.  Here are two blackberry and raspberry combo batches, one batch of raspberry, and a small test batch of black currant jelly.  I started wine from the culled fruit – a batch of raspberry, a blackberry, a currant and an elderberry.  They are in closed buckets and soon I will move them to gallon …

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