Dapper Dog on Road to Recovery

Oscar had surgery a week ago.  It was more complicated than expected.  Monday he had drains removed, and the vet suggested we put a t-shirt on him so he does not lick or scratch his stitches.  It seems to be working       We were told he should not run as he is healing, so we have kept him on leash.  He obviously wants to resume his on farm duties.  Ken’s compromise is to …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This box has greens – spinach, lettuce, salad mix, potato onions or green onions, potatoes and beets from the root cellar and some fresh herbs Field Notes.  Ken keeps a-planting and a-weeding.  Right now he is also getting ready for our spring opener next weekend.  His largest task is clearing some downed wood and I am helping stack once we split it.  Oscar went in for surgery.  He had a benign …

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Blossoms in Cold Weather

Well, after nearly 70 degrees we have had two cold nights.          At this point the Nanking Cherries, plums and some apples are blooming or budded out.         Will the cold mean we will lose the crop? We just have to wait and see!  

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This week’s box has greens – lettuce, salad mix, spinach, wild mustard, green onions, chives, potatoes, celery root, beets, and herbs. Field Notes.  Ken has been planting and transplanting:  his nursery inside the mobile high tunnel, his pepper and tomato plants in the germination cabinet, and the onion seedlings.  He has also been cleaning up the greenhouse in the field; perennial crops have perennial weeds.  And to avoid any possible boredom, …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This CSA box has spinach, lettuce, salad greens, potatoes, beets, celery root, gobo, green onions or chives, potato onions, and herbs.       Field Notes.  Ken is almost done with pruning fruit trees and vines.  He has been planting, and we have received our seed potatoes.  Soon we will set the late crop potato seed to chit in a sunny window.  Last week we had a big spinach harvest – …

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Sprouts for the Animals

Ken has sprouted grain for animal feed for decades.  Sprouting adds nutrition to grain, and is more digestible.          Currently he soaks grain overnight and pours into screens he made.         Then he puts the screens in a rack he got secondhand.         He fills the rack.  He waters the sprouts as needed             If the weather is dry and windy …

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Dafs in the Rye

Last year Ken led us through a renovation of the perennial flower are in the center of the drive.  We pulled out plants, separated weeds, divided, replanted on the other side of the drive, and then pigs and chickens dug up the area.  Ken then planted rye.  It came up early this spring and greened up     And there in the rye, after all the tilling, pigs digging, and chickens scratching are DAFODILS!

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This CSA box has fresh greens – braising and salad, parsnips, gobo, beets, carrots, onions, and fresh herb.       Field Notes.  Pepper plants are looking good.  Tomatoes have been planted.  Onion seedlings are hardening off in the greenhouse.  Ken set up a hoopette for early roots and has planted peas.    I am trying to get my loom warped before I move out doors.  I start cleaning and pricing …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This CSA box has salad mix, spinach, turnip greens, freshly dug parsnips and gobo, carrots, potato onions, potatoes, and fresh herbs Field Notes.  Ken is a busy guy: cleaning up, bed prep and planting.  The peppers are coming up in the germination chamber and next he plants tomatoes.  And there are other spring tasks.  I volunteered to clean the stationary chicken coops so Ken can place broody hens and a clutch …

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Spring Tasks – Cleaning the Coops

One of the many spring tasks is cleaning out coops.  Although we use two portable coops most of the time, the older stationary coops are great spaces for broody hens, tiny chicks, and pesty young cockerels.  This year I volunteered to take on the task.  Fist Ken got me set us with open windows, doors and tools.  As I filled first cart and then wheelbarrow, Ken  shuttled them to the compost pile. Then we had …

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