Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This week’s CSA box has lettuce, kale, arugula, French breakfast radishes, green onions, garlic scapes, snap peas, carrots, parsley, strawberries, and the last of the asparagus.     Field Notes.  Ken is wrapping up asparagus season with weeding and mulching the beds with the assistance of his faithful helper, Oscar the dog!  The plant shoots will grow and send energy to the roots for next year’s crop.  One of the most …

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Encouraging Pollinators

Ken encourages indigenous, native  pollinators.  About a third of our produce requires pollination – the nightshade family of tomatoes, peppers, eggplant and the cucurbit family of summer and winter squash and cucumbers, and legumes like peas and beans.  All these crops flower and once pollinated they set fruit, and we eat the fruit. Two things Ken does – well, actually the first is what he doesn’t do .  He doesn’t use any chemicals.  Chemicals that …

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Tying Up the Tomatoes

Ken plants tomatoes in a mobile high tunnel.  The structure for tying up the tomatoes is in the top structure of the greenhouse.        There is a series of moveable spools that hold twine.          The twine needs replacing every couple years           Once the twine is in place, Ken weeds, cuts suckers…         … and then he clips plants to the twine.  …

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Peas – An Early Summer Favorite

Early each spring Ken plants snap peas.  Once he has cultivated and weeded a couple times, I help him put up the pea fence.       Then they bloom and set fruit.  Snap peas are a edible pod variety.  Just snap off the stem end and pull any “string”  that has grown along the edge.       Snap peas can be eaten raw or blanched for salads, pasta dishes, stir fry; they are …

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Ken’s Living Quilt: The Garden

The garden is in constant change.  Crops grow, fill out, are harvested.  New crops are planted and the cycle begins all over again.       For me it is like an ever changing quilt of different colors, textures and shapes.         After each rain, once the soil is dry enough to work Ken goes through and cultivates.        Today he was using a wheel hoe and seemed to be …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This week’s CSA box has lettuce, salad greens, baby brassica greens, green onions, garlic scapes, radishes, herbs, asparagus, and strawberries. Field Notes.  Sunday we got rain!  It had been dry, and Ken put off irrigating in garden and field when he heard we could get up to 2 inches.  He is still irrigating greenhouses as needed.  Prior to Sunday’s rain he was racing around getting all he could done before the …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This week’s CSA box has lettuce, spinach, salad mix, beet thins, French breakfast radishes, green onions, asparagus, and herbs.         Field Notes.  The word for the week is PLANTING!  Ken has been busy on two fronts: moving up seedling for future greens and crops, and getting roots like potatoes, leeks, seeding in carrot and beet and burdock root.      There is also the maintenance tasks – with …

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Moving up Seedlings

Ken is always starting plants – greens, herbs like cilantro that bolts, etc  When he is unsure of the germination rate, he sows in trays, and then moves to soil blocks       He makes the soil blocks           He then moves the tiny seedlings into the soil blocks, fills with soil, waters and once they are large enough they go out in the garden or field.  This means thinning …

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Pea Fence Is Up

One of the annual tasks here is putting up the pea fence.  Peas are a relatively short season crop.  Their production varies with weather.  Too warm and they simply give up.  So putting up that pea fence is an act of faith     I have ordered several different varieties over the years.  I keep hoping there is one that really doesn’t need a fence. In my over twenty years of picking, I can emphatically …

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My Ambivalent Relationship with Strawberries

I love strawberries.  We grow strawberries, but are limited by several factors such as time and space requirements, my physical condition, price, and uncertainty of production.  What do I mean? Strawberries take space that could grow crops with significantly more production and less labor.  Ken plants them, weeds strawberries several times, composts, pulls out some of the runner plants, transplants, and maintains the crop over multiple seasons.   Imagine transplanting cabbage or broccoli, weeding once and …

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