Flowers from Friends

Each season as flowers bloom I remember which kind friend shared them from her garden.  Right now I have two from my friend Lesa from at least twenty five years ago.  One is a bicolor     and the other is a beautiful lavender           This one is from Janette.             So, in addition to beautiful flowers, I have deep gratitude and beautiful memories

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Pea Fence Is Up

One of the annual tasks here is putting up the pea fence.  Peas are a relatively short season crop.  Their production varies with weather.  Too warm and they simply give up.  So putting up that pea fence is an act of faith     I have ordered several different varieties over the years.  I keep hoping there is one that really doesn’t need a fence. In my over twenty years of picking, I can emphatically …

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My Ambivalent Relationship with Strawberries

I love strawberries.  We grow strawberries, but are limited by several factors such as time and space requirements, my physical condition, price, and uncertainty of production.  What do I mean? Strawberries take space that could grow crops with significantly more production and less labor.  Ken plants them, weeds strawberries several times, composts, pulls out some of the runner plants, transplants, and maintains the crop over multiple seasons.   Imagine transplanting cabbage or broccoli, weeding once and …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This week’s CSA box has lettuce, spinach, salad greens, braising greens, radishes, green onions, asparagus, and herbs Field Notes. Since we have had drier weather, Ken has been busier than ever!  Many things are behind the usual planting schedule.  He has been planting and transplanting: onions in the garden, greens in the garden and by the mobile tunnel, sweet potatoes in the field, replanting washed out carrot seed, watching the beans …

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Irrigating Greenhouse

The mobile high tunnel is now over the heat loving summer crops.  And even though we have gotten lots of rain recently, very little of it goes into the greenhouse – even when Ken opens it up all the way.  So, Ken irrigates the plants.  He moves hoses and uses an irrigation pump to get water from the irrigation pond to the plants   Then the water moves from his trenches between the plants to …

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Goslings Growing

Geese are part of the crew here.  They not only eat grass, provide us with eggs in spring and meat in fall, they also act as a back up to our canine security system.  They only time they are aggressive is when they have eggs or babies to protect     This spring the first batch is growing quickly.  Although they aren’t fully feathered out, they are no longer the roly poly puffy downy balls …

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The Garden is Filling Up – With Transplants

Ken has been trying to work around the weather.  It sounds a bit like Goldilocks and the Three Bears – too wet, too cold, just right.  He finally got to put in several seedlings and now there are rows of small plants.  Soon they be large and form canopy and fill the garden with green.   With the last “weather event” of nearly 2 1/2 inches in under an hour, and close to 6 inches …

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A Guy and His Cuke Fence

Each season Ken constructs a cuke fence.  Since he rotates crops the fence is always in a different place from the prior season.  This year he got it almost done and I offered to help on the top portion – I lift one end of each panel and hold it in place while Ken ties it in place.  Ken finds an angle and vertical growing area for the cucumbers results in fewer curved cukes.  People …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This week’s CSA box has lettuce, spinach, salad mix, asparagus tips, green onions, chives, radishes, and herbs- probably dill. Field Notes.    Ken has transplanted the tomatoes and peppers inside the mobile high tunnel.  He has also been busy transplanting in the garden – onions and brassica family. After the torrential rain – 2 1/2 inches in less than an hour (nearly 6 inches total), Ken had some places where soil was …

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Recipe Ideas for Braising Greens

Spring greens also include some stronger flavored greens.  In Asia and Europe cooks work to provide the bitter flavor as part of any meal.  In America we usually avoid it.  In Europe folks buy bitter tonics as a digestive and spring tonic.  In Japan every meal we were served had a sweet, sour, salty, bitter and umami (savory or brothy).    Here we currently offer chicory and turnip greens.  we have offered dandelion greens.  Each …

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