Over Dyeing Denim for Future Rugs

While Ken was away I decided to dye some faded denim.  I received several balls of denim rags about a year ago.  Some of the rags were very faded.  Faded rags do not make a very colorful rug. Bright or deep colored rugs sell better than faded ones.         Years ago I took a natural dye class and was told that natural dyes work better on animal fibers like wool than plant …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This week’s CSA box has greens, radishes, potatoes, beans, tomatoes, scallions, carrots or beets, cucumbers, zucchini, peppers, Walla Walla sweet onions, garlic, basil and parsley. Field Notes.  Ken has started harvesting onions – first the Walla Walla onions.  Next it will be the red onions, and then the storage onions.  Once he digs and pulls them he leaves them to dry.  Then he moves them to the racks and I help …

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Hens – New Location

Ken provides sequential pasture for animals here.  That means he moves hens and pigs as needed so they get fresh areas to scratch (chickens) or root up ( pigs) Here is the new location for the “egg mobile” that has hens and turkeys in it

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Onion Harvest Starts with the Walla Walla Onions

Ken has begun harvesting onions.  He pulled the Walla Walla Sweet onions and set them to dry.  Then He loaded them up and brought them to the drying racks.  I helped him set them on the racks to cure. Walla Walla sweet onions is a variety from Walla Walla, Washington.  They are juicy and sweet, but don’t keep much past Halloween.  Every year when I start to use them in the kitchen, Ken accuses me …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This week’s CSA box has greens, bok choy, cukes and zukes, potatoes, peppers, beans, beets or carrots, onions, garlic, parsley and the first of the basil Field Notes.  The garden tour was Sunday.  It always marks a turning point in the summer for us.  The crops look good.  The days are starting to seem shorter.  Ken can take a deep breath and prepare for the rest of the season Ken is …

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Harvesting Garlic and Potato Onions

Ken harvested the garlic and potato onions around the rain – he lets them dry in the field for a day or two and then loads them and brings them to the racks.      Potato onions are an interesting onion that is planted from the onions themselves rather than seed,  As they grow they form clumps.  Potato onions are larger than shallots and taste halfway between onions and shallots.  They are our best keepers …

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Coming Soon – Farm Tour – Reserve your Spot!

 Farm Tour!  Less than a week away.  Sunday July 24th, 2 – 4 p.m. Rain or Shine  Tour the growing spaces – garden fields, greenhouses and we wrap it all up with a garden lunch.     Tips – from asparagus to zucchini – compost, tomatoes, etc. See ideas grown over the decades like  a cuke fence to tying up tomatoes Planning on attending?  Let us know so Judith knows how much food to prepare …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This week’s CSA box has salad and braising greens, Carrots, snap peas, herbs, green onions, the first of the potatoes, beans, and green top Walla Walla onions Field Notes.  The key words for the week are green manures and mulch!  Ken is nearly done mulching.  And he has green manures coming up all over – field to the former flower garden!   Last weekend Ken traveled to the Mother Earth News …

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Harvest Newsletter

Greetings from the Garden!  This week’s CSA box has salad and braising greens, herbs, garlic scapes, green onions, snap peas, carrots or beets, asparagus, and strawberries. Field Notes.  Ken has started mulching.  First he cultivates, then pulls any larger weeds, then spreads mulch to cover the soil – it keeps soil temperatures moderate to promote microbial life in the soil, and it lowers weed pressure.  Ken tries to keep soil covered with either mulch or …

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Strawberries – A Love Hate Relationship

I love strawberries.  They are usually the first fruit after a long winter.  And I don’t mind picking a limited quantity bent over or on my hands and knees.  The Germans, I am told, call them ground berries – and for good reason.     Finding strawberries grown without chemicals is challenging.  They are usually one of the top crops listed on the Environmental Working Group’s Dirty Dozen crops with pesticide residue.   Strawberries are …

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